June 29th, 2010

Ecoroof Update: Entry

Just a quick update, nodding onions, self heal and yarrow are in full bloom on our entry ecoroof. This ecoroof was a bit of an experiment. Sedums are the standard go-to plant for ecoroofs, hardy drought tolerant succulents that thrive in poor soil. As a result they’re pretty much always used, especially on ecoroofs that aren’t irrigated. So for our entry, we decided to try something that doesn’t have any sedums and instead went with an assortment of native wildflowers and grasses. As this progresses we’ll see what is able to make it through the summer and what pops back up again next spring, but right now its all looking great. The Douglas Asters are yet to bloom, and it looks like we planted a little too late to establish the Oregon Iris and Camas in time for them to bloom this spring so hopefully they’ll go next year, the strawberries looked happy right away and continue to do well.

3 Comments

  1. Looks great! Can’t wait to see it in person soon.

    Comment by Kirsten — July 1, 2010 @ 13:51
  2. What kind of soil medium did you use for your various ecoroofs? And how deep did you make them? I’m finally getting close to actually planting our long-planned ecoroofs, and curious about details for what conditions the strawberry, camassia, nodding onions, self heal, and yarrow require… Thanks in advance!

    Norris

    Comment by Norris Thomlinson — September 13, 2010 @ 23:35
  3. We used the extensive ecoroof mix from Phillips’ Soil. Its mostly pumice with some compost and decomposed bark dust, and so far it seems pretty good. The depth on our ecoroofs varies from three to six inches. As for the conditions for various plants, the entry ecoroof sees pretty harsh conditions, probably because it is just a canopy and doesn’t have an insulated house below it, so our strawberries didn’t make it through the last heat wave… We do however have strawberries on our ecoroof above our kitchen which gets full hot afternoon sun and are doing great. I might recommend sedums for any roof with particularly harsh exposure, although the nodding onions seem to be happy just about anywhere as well.

    Comment by Matt — September 14, 2010 @ 08:51

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